5 Reasons Book Buying Bans Need to Chill

You need to get off that book buying ban immediately.

“Um, Jordyn, this book buying ban is the only reason I have any money in my wallet.”

I know. Trust me, I get it. Book buying bans, in theory, are a reader’s best friend! They keep your spending habits in check and, most of all, help you focus on the books that you do have, rather than the ones that you don’t, which forces you to cut down that TBR like a kick-butt samurai.

However, there are most definitely reasons why book buying bans need to chill out:

1. “Everything in moderation.” 

Yes, that little piece of advice was originally stated in relation to food, but the same principle applies. Now, I’m no health professional, but in my opinion, when you want to eat healthier, the proper way to do it isn’t to completely cut out a food group. If you want to cut back on your carbs, you cut back on your carbs, you don’t cut them out in their entirety.

It’s the same thing with book buying. Feel free to slow down on the book buying, but don’t completely cut yourself off. Too much of anything is bad for you. Everything in moderation.

2. You lose the hype

I went on a book buying ban myself for the few months of this year and I despised it. Mostly because there were so many wonderful books coming out that I didn’t get to be excited for. Oh, one of your most anticipated releases of 2017 comes out next week? TOO BAD. You’re on a book buying ban until next month.

I felt this a lot earlier this year. Anyone in the book communnity can tell you about all the amazing books that came out, and I only allowed myself to finally buy them last week. Being caught up in all of the hype and getting to post a picture of your new book or tweet about it is really fun and I underestimated how much I enjoy it. It may sound shallow, but one of the best parts of buying something new is showing it off while it’s still relevant.

3. They’re really easy to break

Thanks for this one, Mia! Temptation to break a ban is all around us, especially if you’re a bookstagrammer/booktuber/blogger/on book twitter, or if you watch/view any of these. Even going to Target or browsing Epic Reads can be deadly. The books you want are everywhere, and because of this, I actually stopped watching booktube while on my ban and avoided twitter and instagram on release days of books I really wanted.

Of course I’m happy that people I’m following are getting some exciting new reading material, I’m also frustrated and sad that I don’t have it. Maybe it’s selfish, but I want that book, and I don’t want to stare at things I can’t have! Which leads me to my next point…

4. You don’t deserve it

The truth is, we all deserve a little gift to ourselves every now and then.200

Whether you got through a really tough week of life or you aced that Calculus test, there is absolutely no shame in giving yourself the gift of a book. Your friends and family don’t have to be the only ones to buy you presents. You are more than allowed to reward yourself for your hard work with a cake book.

5. You’re going to buy them all later anyway

I realize that a lot of the time, we go on bans to prevent impulse-buying. But, at least in my case, I tend to make a list of all the books I’ve wanted to buy and then go out and purchase them as soon as the ban ends.

This is kind of going back to reason #1, all things in moderation. Dropping a bunch of money on a haul as soon as your ban is over is, while thrilling, completely nonsensical. It makes a lot more sense, to me at least, to spread your book buying out throughout a period of time.


There you have it bibliophiles! Don’t get me wrong, I completely see the attraction of book buying bans. I mean, I only recently purged myself of them. If they work for you, then go for it.

I, on the other hand, will enjoy my books in moderation. Maybe make list of the books I’ll allow myself to buy for a specific time, or a number I’ll limit myself to every month.

Do you find book buying bans helpful? Do you end up buying all the books back like me, or do you actually reduce spending? Do you agree with me and think that book buying bans need to chill out? Tell me in the comments! 🙂

Stay bookish,

Jordyn

Find me elsewhere: Instagram | Twitter | Goodreads

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28 thoughts on “5 Reasons Book Buying Bans Need to Chill

  1. hahah this is so true, my goodness. I always try to go on a book buying ban and it never works because I just buy ebooks and justify it because “they’re cheap”. Actually, whats helped me not buy books right now is that I’m completely out of space for any new ones, but I still buy all my anticipated reads. Every thing else, I go to my library for. But, girl, so true. There’s nothing wrong with spoiling yourself, and we’ll probably buy all the books in the end anyways.

    Molly @ Molly’s Book Nook

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  2. I went cold turkey after buying over 150 books in one year. Oops! Book buying bans are good, and sometimes necessary, but I definitely agree that they have their cons! I banned myself from buying books and completely lost interest in booktube because no one was reading what I was.

    As you said, a good approach is probably moderation. Now I occasionally buy new releases, while mainly focusing on the books I already have. If there’s a new book I really want to read I’ll borrow it from the library, alternatively I’ll turn it into a little treasure hunt by trying to find it in a charity shop! The moderation plan works for me at the moment. Although I warn you, don’t get a job in a bookstore, even temporarily! Say goodbye to your money when there are discounts around! ^.^

    Liked by 1 person

    1. 150 books?!?!? How on earth did your bookshelf survive?! (You might need a ban after all, haha!)
      Yes, moderation is definitely key and will, hopefully, prevent you from buying so many this year! (Although in all honesty, it sounds like you’re living in heaven). And working at a bookstore? MY DREAM.

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      1. I ended up with two new bookshelves and started using space in my wardrobe. I discovered £1 books at charity shops and it just happened…

        I’ve been very good since. The amount of books I have to read is overwhelming enough. 😛 It is like a heaven to be fair, it’s like my room is a library! Except I don’t lend my books to people… XD It was great being around so many books, and people who loved them too! I just wish I’d stayed there longer. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I rarely buy books, mostly because I utilize my local library a LOT. I do buy myself a book if it’s not at the library or to treat myself, but for me libraries are usually the way to go.

    Awesome post, and I just want to further thank you for letting me ask you so many questions on Twitter.

    If you have the time, please check out my blog @breenysbooks. I’d love any feedback. Have a wonderful day!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I survived a year long book buying ban. But only barely, and only because my job at the time provided ARCs for new releases. Did make a nice dent in my TBR, though. That being said, I was ecstatic when the ban was “lifted” and I could acquire one or two new books every month, as per usual.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I definitely think book buying bans should be in moderation. Personally, I like the way I’m doing it: because I had SO MANY books I’d bought (physical or kindle) over the years and never read, this year, I’m only allowing myself to buy 1 new book for ever 2 old books I read. So far it’s working really well (and including ARCs, I’m actually way ahead on my TBR). It’s definitely helping me moderate which books I buy instead of going on a crazy spending spree.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I agree! TO be honest, I don’t think I have a huge book buying problem, and so I haven’t really had to ban myself. I think point number 5 is the most important–if you’re going to buy the book at some point anyway, why wouldn’t you get it during the release? I also use the library a LOT because I don’t have that much money and am also really stingy. I’ve never really got book buying bans because why can’t people restrain themselves? (fun fact: a teacher gave me the ‘moderation’ advice for like, everything in life. It’s very sensible. *nods*)

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  7. 100% agree. An actual ban isn’t that realistic. Sure, lots of people CAN do it but I don’t really see the point. If you can’t afford something than you aren’t really on a ban – you are just waiting until you can buy it lol I don’t do bans at all anymore lol I gave up!

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  8. Ahh I love this post!! I’m glad you made some use out of my ramblings 😂 Moderation is definitely key!! Right now I put myself on a particular buying ban where I can only buy one per after I’ve read two off of my TBR (cause we all know how ridiculous that mountain is). So far it seems to be working! I’m reducing my consumption without completely limiting myself, just like if I were on a diet 😄

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I was able to last for about 4 months of a book buying ban earlier this year, but then once I let myself buy them again I went CRAZY and spent way too much, lol. So I think moderation is definitely key. It helped that I made a rule that a book has to be under $8 for me to buy it (Amazon is surprisingly good at lowering its prices every once in a while on books), unless it’s a book I really really want, or a sequel. But I definitely agree with your point about losing the hype! I hate letting the hype pass me by sometimes, but then other times if the hype has passed but I’m still interested in it, I know it’s definitely a worthy buy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, I definitely end up splurging after I go on a book buying ban, although I try to limit myself! And thank God for Amazon and it’s incredible low prices! Barnes & Noble who? And although passing hype does suck, if it’s a really great book, it’ll still be great after the hype!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I don’t think they need to chill. I’ve been doing extremely well on my buying ban. I’ve been concentrating on what I have and new releases I want to read I borrow them from the library. In turn, I’m saving money and supporting libraries. Right now, supporting libraries is important because there is a huge chance that federal funding for them is going to be cut.

    Liked by 1 person

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